Egyptis Palace

The Birth

 

This is one of the children of Puzzle and RainbowMyst

On the day that I received this cacoon, Puzzle and RainbowMyst where both there. RainbowMyst had just had her first clutch, and Puzzle stood at her side, pride flashing through his eyes. He looked from her, to me, and back to her, and licked her gently. She smiled as she looked upon her clutch, and looked to her caretaker as well. As if on some hidden cue, both me and Siren went and picked one of the cacoons for our own. We both picked the smallest ones, great things come in small packages. I touched RainbowMyst gently on the head, and whispered, "Great job," in her ear. She smiled at me warmly. Then I got on Puzzle's back, and we flew to my house. I sent him back, so he could be with his loved one.

Name:Belleuphia
Gender:unknown
Tribe:unknown
Age:cacoon
Abilities:unknown
 

I took the cacoon into my house, and set it gently down on the bed where I first found Puzzle. I sat down next to it, and stroked the soft shelter of the baby inside. Searching for a name, I started pacing. Suddenly, the room began swirling, and I found myself back in the cave where not that long ago, I had first come across Shift and Confusion, Puzzle's parents. I wandered into the cave that they had called their home. My eyes fell upon a golden casket, writing inscribed upon it. I looked closely at the words, and my heart gave a great leap. They were addressed to me!

It read:

Two legged one, I am fortunate that I found you. Great things will become of Puzzle, I can feel it in my broken body. He will mate, one day, with a beautiful Egyptis, and they will have a clutch, like no other. The babies will be beautiful, each carrying traits of their parents. Take one, and guard it wisely.  For me, as a last request, I beg of you, name the child Belleuphia. This name has a sacred meaning to me, one that you will find out someday, but not today. I trust you to do what I have asked. I saw great things in you as well, child. Don't let harm fall to any of them.

Crying at the Egyptis's words, I nodded and whispered, "I will do as you ask." As I spoke these words, I found myself back in my room. I took the cacoon up, in my arms, and again stroked it gently. With tears still in my eyes, I whispered to it, "Precious Belleuphia, your grandmother would be proud." Unless it was my imagination, I was sure that I felt the baby within the cacoon stir at the sound of its name.